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critiquing consumer surveys May 5, 2016

Posted by Bradley in : consumers , trackback

This article identifies some of the problems with the endless consumer surveys we are subjected to all the time:

Problems with surveys are two-fold, researchers said. First, too many surveys with too many questions turn off consumers. Second, results that are tied to employee bonuses — or jobs — prove inaccurate. Combined, these problems are turning a useful method of interacting with customers into a headache.

But there’s often an additional problem, as the surveys tend to focus on the performance of the people who are actually providing the services. If I book Sears to provide repair services for a washing machine the survey will ask me how happy I was with the service provided by the person who actually came to my home to work on the machine. The surveys control the service providers pretty well. They don’t tend to ask for feedback on how pleasant or unpleasant it is to interact with the firm as a whole rather than the particular individuals you deal with. And if the experience overall is horrible but the person you actually interact with seems to do a good job and is pleasant to deal with, of course you will give them the high score. But this may be misleading.

The article suggests that it can be a problem if customers are effectively “bribed” to give positive feedback. I am not so sure: asking your customers to speak to you before giving you a lower score than 10 so you can persuade them to give a higher score is in some sense about consumer satisfaction.

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